Bookworm grandfather’s review

Charles Pepper wrote from Thailand to say what he thought of the book:

Beefeater in blue uniform

“An engaging and very readable thriller with a dramatic ending; the reader is drawn into this fast moving tale as it’s easy to relate to the characters, settings and drama. The descriptions, many interesting true facts, real historic events and landmarks that still exist, the twists, turns and illustrations all bring the tale very much to life.

“I would recommend this book for both girls and boys; parents, grandparents and teachers will find it an enjoyable story to share with youngsters; and if you’d like to see the Dragons in London today, you can.”

Read the whole review here

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Can you please review my book?

Have you read the book? Did you like it? I’d love to know what you thought of it! Other people want to know what you thought, too, to help them decide whether to read it or not.
If you’re happy to write a review but don’t know how, I’ve put some guidelines here to help you.
Oscar 1
Oscar is outraged by the fate of one particular character

For instance, you could say:

– what you loved
– what you didn’t like
– how you felt at important moments in the book (was it funny, scary, joyful, exciting etc)
– your favourite and least favourite characters (and why)
– if you were surprised by the ending
– how you felt at important moments in the story
– if you want a sequel
– who else you think will like the book
– how many stars would you give it?
You can write as much as you like – from one sentence to a whole page – the more the better! And you can write in English or Romanian. If you can include a picture of you reading the book that would be a lovely bonus…

George and Xiaolong’s chums at the Tower

Meet the ravens of the Tower of London in this BBC profile – along with the Yeoman Warder lucky enough to look after them – the Ravenmaster, Chris Skaife. Ravens_005 and

Exciting, yes, but there’s more to it.

Sair & bookshelf

Sarah Grant, English teacher and British expat in Bucuresti, had this to say about the book (and more).

Arabella McIntyre-Brown’s exciting Dragons Over London brings home the values of loyalty, courage and openmindedness through a whirlwind of magic, suspense and adventure. Whether you’re a tiny mouse or a huge dragon, acceptance and truth are the crux to overcoming bigotry, discrimination and prejudice to build strength and resilience in the face of adversity…. Read the whole review here.

Celebrate George’s Day with a dragon!

18010111_10155187063807359_941950006086771224_nTo England, 23rd April (today) is St George’s Day, dedicated to the country’s patron saint.

It’s always upset me that mean old George was so horrible to the poor dragon.  It was even worse when the ultra-right neo-fascist idiots used the English flag of St George to demonstrate English supremacy over the world, and all foreigners. Idiots. Don’t get me started on their xenophobic bigotry. They don’t have any idea where the ‘English’ came from…

BUT these days I celebrate this day not just as William Shakespeare’s birth (and death) day, but as the special day for my little George and his spectacular dragon, Xiaolong.

COVER dragoniThey both feature in my new book, published by Booklet Fiction in May, all about these two heroes and some other more villainous dragons, all vying for victory in the skies of London.

Not only that… here’s something that most readers won’t get to know. But towards the end of the book, something happens on this very day, Sunday 23rd April 2017. What’s going on in London today? The London Marathon. I’m going to say nothing more about it here – you’ll have to read the book to find out.

Actually, the precise date doesn’t matter too much, but when I was doing my research and calculations for the book, this was the date I fixed on. So now you know…

George and Xiaolong are talking
Brave, loyal mouse George hushes the imperial dragon

 

 

 

 

New Year at the Tower of London

On the sunny 2nd January 2017… what else but a trip to the Tower? Could have spent the whole day there – too much to see. I must only have seen 20% of what’s there for visitors, and had no time for just mooching around watching and looking. Tickets seem expensive at £25 but actually it’s fantastic value. From the 11th century well in the basement to Henry VIII’s armour , it’s an astonishing slug of over 1,000 years of English history, all in one place.

I last went to the Tower as a child – my father’s firm supplied slaked lime to the Tower in the early 1960s for the repair of the stone walls, so we were given free entry – quite some privilege! I hadn’t been back for 50 years, but it was worth the wait.

 

And the reason for the visit? I wanted to do some vital research for my new book, Dragons over London, which will be set in London (the clue’s in the title), and mostly at the Tower, where my hero, the Chinese dragon Xiaolong, has been living since he arrived in 1086. The Tower has changed a bit in nearly 1,000 years of turbulent history, but not that much. Built by William the Conqueror, it was at the heart of London’s history for over 600 years as the most important royal palace and the greatest building in London.

It’s very easy to imagine a dragon lying on the roof and taking off from that parapet to glide through the London sky…