Can you please review my book?

Have you read the book? Did you like it? I’d love to know what you thought of it! Other people want to know what you thought, too, to help them decide whether to read it or not.
If you’re happy to write a review but don’t know how, I’ve put some guidelines here to help you.
Oscar 1
Oscar is outraged by the fate of one particular character

For instance, you could say:

– what you loved
– what you didn’t like
– how you felt at important moments in the book (was it funny, scary, joyful, exciting etc)
– your favourite and least favourite characters (and why)
– if you were surprised by the ending
– how you felt at important moments in the story
– if you want a sequel
– who else you think will like the book
– how many stars would you give it?
You can write as much as you like – from one sentence to a whole page – the more the better! And you can write in English or Romanian. If you can include a picture of you reading the book that would be a lovely bonus…

What an editor does for a book

The author is only the first part of the process in producing a book. We get all the credit, of course, and lots of people don’t realise the number of other professionals involved in turning a few thousand words into an attractive, readable, desirable book. In the first of a series of articles about the publishing process, here’s my editor, Ruxandra Campeanu, to explain the part she plays.

Foto_micaMy favourite moment while editing Dragons over London was seeing the layout with the illustrations in place. Up to that point, I had mostly been concerned with the text, and that was the very first time when I got an idea of how the book would look like as a physical object. I particularly liked the scene where the mice, upon having learnt that Xiaolong had been deceiving them, decide to withdraw their support from him. I loved the way the text and the illustration on page 122 come together to capture the emotional intensity of the moment…”

Read the whole article here. 

George and Xiaolong’s chums at the Tower

Meet the ravens of the Tower of London in this BBC profile – along with the Yeoman Warder lucky enough to look after them – the Ravenmaster, Chris Skaife. Ravens_005 and

Ginger cats really hate this book

Mary & Weasley
Weasley was so disgusted by this point that Mary couldn’t keep him still

While Mary Estes loved the book and couldn’t put it down, Weasley the ginger cat was disgusted by all the mice, and there is a point in the book that most cats turn off. You’ll have to read it to find out which bit, but I’d advise you not to read it to your cat. Especially if your cat is ginger…

*gasp!* First run SOLD OUT

cropped-cover-dragoni-cropped.jpgI’ve just spoken to the publisher, Mona, and she had this amazing news. Less than a week after launching the dragons at Bookfest, the whole of the first print run (3,000 copies) is sold out! The book is already being reprinted…

Congratulations to the Booklet Fiction team – I’m amazed and delighted. Onwards and upwards!